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100+ Spelling Rules in Grammar with Examples

100+ Spelling Rules in Grammar with Examples. Spelling Rules in Grammar
Spelling Rules

Welcome to the world of words and letters! Today, we’re talking about important things called Spelling Rules. These are like secret codes that help us write words correctly in English. Whether you’re good with words or just starting, knowing these rules makes writing much easier. In this blog, we’ll explore simple and useful Spelling Rules in English. Think of them as friendly guides that show us how to put letters together the right way. We’ll share tips and tricks to make sure your words look and sound just right. So, if you want to be a spelling superstar, join us on this journey. Together, we’ll learn how to use these special rules to write with confidence and have fun with words! Let’s get started on this spelling adventure!

100+ Spelling Rules in Grammar with Examples
Spelling Rules

Spelling Rules

  1. “ie” Exceptions:
    There are exceptions to the “i before e” rule, such as in words like “science” and “weird.”
  2. Words Ending in “-ly”:
    Adverbs are often formed by adding “-ly” to adjectives (e.g., quick – quickly).
  3. “ful” and “less” Suffixes:
    Use “-ful” to indicate fullness or having the qualities of, and “-less” to indicate without (e.g., joyful, fearless).
  4. Prefix “Pre-“:
    The prefix “pre-” means before (e.g., preview, prehistoric).
  5. Words Ending in “-tion” and “-sion”:
    Many words ending in “-tion” or “-sion” are derived from Latin (e.g., information, discussion).
  6. “Qu” Digraph:
    In English, “qu” is a common digraph representing the /kw/ sound (e.g., quick, quiet).
  7. Consonant + “le” at the End of Words:
    The final “e” in words ending in a consonant + “le” is usually pronounced as a schwa sound (e.g., middle, simple).
  8. Words Ending in “-ous”:
    Adjectives ending in “-ous” mean characterized by or full of (e.g., courageous, delicious).
  9. Prefix “Sub-“:
    The prefix “sub-” means under or below (e.g., submarine, submerge).
  10. Words Ending in “-ph” or “-gh”:
    Words like “graph” and “laugh” follow unique pronunciation patterns.
  11. Words Ending in “-dge”:
    The spelling “-dge” is used to represent the /j/ sound after a short vowel (e.g., bridge).
  12. “ce” and “se” Endings:
    Use “ce” when the sound is /s/ (e.g., space), and “se” when the sound is /z/ (e.g., prize).
  13. Prefix “Ex-“:
    The prefix “ex-” often means out of or former (e.g., exit, ex-president).
  14. Words Ending in “-ive”:
    Adjectives ending in “-ive” often describe the quality or nature of something (e.g., creative, active).
  15. Words Ending in “-er” and “-est” for One-Syllable Adjectives:
    For one-syllable adjectives, add “-er” to form the comparative and “-est” for the superlative (e.g., tall – taller – tallest).
  16. “A” and “An” Usage:
    Use “a” before words that begin with a consonant sound, and “an” before words that begin with a vowel sound (e.g., a cat, an hour).
  17. Words Ending in “-tion” with a Silent “T”:
    Some words ending in “-tion” have a silent “t” (e.g., nation, motion).
  18. Prefix “Re-“:
    The prefix “re-” often means again or back (e.g., return, review).
  19. Words Ending in “-cian” and “-sion”:
    Words ending in “-cian” often denote a person, while “-sion” indicates a state or quality (e.g., musician, decision).
  20. Words Ending in “-ible” and “-able”:
    If the root word ends in “e,” drop the “e” before adding “-able” (e.g., change – changeable). Keep the “e” if the ending is “-ible” (e.g., visible).
  21. “Ei” and “Ie” Spelling:
    “I” before “e” except after “c,” or when sounded like “ay” as in “neighbor” and “weigh.”
  22. Words Ending in “-ed”:
    The “-ed” ending is used for regular past tense verbs, pronounced as /t/ after voiceless sounds (e.g., jumped) and /d/ after voiced sounds (e.g., played).
  23. Prefix “En-“:
    The prefix “en-” often means to cause to be in a certain state (e.g., enrich, enlarge).
  24. Words with Silent “H”:
    Some words have a silent “h,” like in “honest” or “hour.”
  25. Words with Silent “G”:
    Words like “gnaw” and “gnome” have a silent “g.”
  26. “Able” and “Ible” Endings:
    If the root word ends in “e,” drop the “e” before adding “-able” (e.g., like – likable). Keep the “e” if the ending is “-ible” (e.g., audible).
  27. “C” and “K” Spelling Rules:
    Use “c” when followed by “e,” “i,” or “y” (e.g., ice), and use “k” when followed by “a,” “o,” “u,” or a consonant (e.g., oak).
  28. “Ious” and “Uous” Endings:
    Adjectives ending in “-ious” and “-uous” often describe a quality or state (e.g., curious, continuous).
  29. Words Ending in “-ly”:
    Adjectives ending in “-ly” often describe how something is done (e.g., friendly, quickly).
  30. “Gh” Pronunciation:
    The pronunciation of “gh” varies, such as in “enough” (/əˈnʌf/) and “ghost” (/ɡoʊst/).
  31. “Ough” Pronunciation:
    The “ough” letter combination has multiple pronunciations (e.g., enough, through, though).
  32. Prefix “Out-“:
    The prefix “out-” often means outside or beyond (e.g., outgrow, outlook).
  33. “Ate” and “It” Endings:
    Words ending in “-ate” often indicate an action or a state (e.g., celebrate), while “-ite” often denotes a person (e.g., activist).
  34. Words Ending in “-phobia”:
    Words ending in “-phobia” describe an irrational fear of something (e.g., arachnophobia).
  35. Words with Silent “W”:
    Some words have a silent “w,” like in “wrestle” or “wrist.”
  36. Prefix “Over-“:
    The prefix “over-” often means above or too much (e.g., overachieve, overeat).
  37. Words Ending in “-ough”:
    The “-ough” ending in words like “cough” and “tough” has unique pronunciations.
  38. Words with Silent “K”:
    Words like “knight” and “knee” have a silent “k.”
  39. “Able” and “Ible” Exceptions:
    Some words follow unique patterns for the use of “-able” and “-ible,” such as “responsible” and “visible.”
  40. “E” and “I” in Compound Words:
    In compound words, the spelling “i” comes before “e” (e.g., believe).
  41. Words Ending in “-yze”:
    Words ending in “-yze” indicate a process or action (e.g., analyze).
  42. Prefix “Under-“:
    The prefix “under-” often means beneath or below (e.g., underwater, underestimate).
  43. Words Ending in “-cial” and “-tial”:
    Adjectives ending in “-cial” and “-tial” often describe a quality (e.g., beneficial, essential).
  44. “U” and “V” Spelling:
    Use “u” after “q” and before “e” (e.g., queue), and use “v” in most other cases.
  45. Words Ending in “-ary” and “-ery”:
    Words ending in “-ary” often denote a place or related to, while “-ery” often refers to a collection or place (e.g., library, bakery).
  46. Words Ending in “-hood” and “-ship”:
    Words ending in “-hood” denote a state of being, and “-ship” denotes a state or condition (e.g., childhood, friendship).
  47. Prefix “Anti-“:
    The prefix “anti-” often means against or opposite (e.g., anti-inflammatory).
  48. “Ous” and “Us” Endings:
    Adjectives ending in “-ous” often describe a quality (e.g., spacious), while “-us” often indicates a state (e.g., curious).
  49. Prefix “Bi-“:
    The prefix “bi-” often means two or double (e.g., bicycle, bilingual).
  50. Words Ending in “-ly” and “-le”:
    Adverbs often end in “-ly,” while adjectives end in “-le” (e.g., quickly, gentle).
  51. “E” and “A” Pronunciation:
    The pronunciation of “e” and “a” may vary in words like “bread” (/brɛd/) and “great” (/ɡreɪt/).
  52. Words Ending in “-dge” and “-ge”:
    The “-dge” ending follows a short vowel sound (e.g., fudge), while “-ge” follows a long vowel sound (e.g., page).
  53. “S” and “C” Pronunciation:
    The pronunciation of “s” and “c” may vary, such as in “cent” (/sɛnt/) and “city” (/sɪti/).
  54. Prefix “Trans-“:
    The prefix “trans-” often means across or beyond (e.g., transport, transform).
  55. Words Ending in “-er” with a Long “E” Sound:
    Some words ending in “-er” have a long “e” sound (e.g., teacher).
  56. “Ough” Pronunciation Variation:
    Words like “bough” and “cough” have different pronunciations.
  57. Words Ending in “-or” and “-er”:
    Nouns ending in “-or” often denote a doer or agent (e.g., actor), while “-er” is a common ending for nouns indicating a person or thing associated with an action (e.g., teacher).
  58. Words with Silent “L”:
    Some words have a silent “l,” like in “palm” or “salmon.”
  59. Prefix “Co-“:
    The prefix “co-” often means together or with (e.g., cooperate, coordinate).
  60. Double Consonant Exceptions:
    Some words do not follow the rule of doubling the final consonant before adding a suffix (e.g., visit – visiting).


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